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Keeping even temps

 
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kiltedBBQer



Joined: 06 Apr 2007
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Apr 29 2007    Post subject: Keeping even temps Reply with quote

All,

I am having problems keeping my temp even across cook time (4 hrs).

My grill is a Char broil Silver ( I think) and I am using maple wood logs. The wood catched on fire pretty well and thats what raises the temp. How do I keep it from spiking the temp?

Thanks for any help.

Kilty
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Harry Nutczak
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Joined: 01 Mar 2007
Posts: 8558
Location: The Northwoods

PostPosted: Apr 29 2007    Post subject: Reply with quote

smaller pieces maybe? air intake adjustments,

Just guesses on my part, but maybe I am correct?
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marvsbbq
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Joined: 15 May 2005
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PostPosted: Apr 29 2007    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could also be some of the wood is drier than another piece(s) That is why it is best to stay WITH the smoker so you can make minor adjustments when things like this happens. I know a lot of guys want to 'set it and forget it' but most smokers are hard (if not impossible) to do that with. Even my comercial pits are not that way... Crying or Very sad
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Doc1680
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Joined: 17 Jun 2005
Posts: 2609
Location: Indianapolis

PostPosted: Apr 29 2007    Post subject: Reply with quote

marvsbbq wrote:
Could also be some of the wood is drier than another piece(s) That is why it is best to stay WITH the smoker so you can make minor adjustments when things like this happens. I know a lot of guys want to 'set it and forget it' but most smokers are hard (if not impossible) to do that with. Even my comercial pits are not that way... Crying or Very sad


I coudn't agree more. Learning to tend your fire is critical. I am one that doesn't mind doing it. If you just recently got your pit, you should take some time to really learn it. How it acts in wind. How it acts if it rains. ect.. That means babysitting it. But that's half the fun for me. I guess it's a "man over fire" thing.
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Alien BBQ
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Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 5426
Location: Roswell, New Mexico

PostPosted: Apr 29 2007    Post subject: Reply with quote

Use a general (and I do mean general) set up to learn what to do. Position your charcoal grate in the box with about 2-3 inches of air space under the rack. Start with some lump or charcoal (about 2 lbs) burning in the center of your fire box with the lid open, after about 15 minutes, put on two forearm size (12 inches in length) pieces of wood and let them burn (with the lid still open) down for about 20 minutes. Close the lid on the firebox and crack your air inlet open about 2 fingers wide and completely open your exhaust stack. After the fire has been burning for about 30 minutes with the lid closed, check out the temp of your smoker. It should be about 200 250 degrees. If it is, look at the firebox and see if you have a small brisk fire going with plenty of wood to last for 30 minutes to an hour and light smoke. If so, go get your meat and put it on. If the smoker is not up to temp, open the air inlet another inch. If it is too hot, close it inch.

After you put your meat on, do not check it for 30 minutes. At that time, only open the firebox and see the condition of your fire. You will most likely need to add one piece of wood to the fire to keep it going every hour. While this is a basic set up and not all cookers act the same, it does give you a place to start. Many times, I will hear students saying that they have tried everything to control their temperatures. The problem is that they try something different every time and never really study what they are doing right or wrong. If you have nothing to do next weekend, put a large aluminum pan of cold water in the smoker (instead of meat) and practice making adjustments. Sure, it will cost you some wood, but you will get to know the idiosyncrasies of your particular smoker and you will learn a valuable lesson that might have taken a year to cover while smoking.
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Doc1680
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Joined: 17 Jun 2005
Posts: 2609
Location: Indianapolis

PostPosted: Apr 29 2007    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alien BBQ wrote:
If you have nothing to do next weekend, put a large aluminum pan of cold water in the smoker (instead of meat) and practice making adjustments. Sure, it will cost you some wood, but you will get to know the idiosyncrasies of your particular smoker and you will learn a valuable lesson that might have taken a year to cover while smoking.


That's an excellent idea. You are the guru Alien.
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