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Absolute beginner need help on first cook

 
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BurnBern
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Joined: 17 Jul 2015
Posts: 147
Location: UK

PostPosted: Tue Oct 03 17 5:46 am    Post subject: Absolute beginner need help on first cook Reply with quote

Hi I’m ready to do my very first ever cook on my recently finished smoker. I’ve never smoker anything in my life so I’m an absolute beginner.

I’m ready to do so chicken legs and a couple of racks of ribs. But being here in the UK I don’t have access to all the spices and rubs that you guys have.

What would you recommend for the chicken. Spices and what temps temps for it also.

Like wise for the ribs spices and temps and how long to cook.

Also would you place the ribs on the grate above the chicken or vice versa.

Thanks in advance
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animal
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 03 17 8:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since I dont know what spices you have I cant answer that one, but never chicken of top of anything due to cross contamination and bacteria
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BurnBern
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Joined: 17 Jul 2015
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Location: UK

PostPosted: Tue Oct 03 17 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

animal wrote:
Since I dont know what spices you have I cant answer that one, but never chicken of top of anything due to cross contamination and bacteria


Sorry should have been more clearer. I have all usual spices salt pepper paprika etc and those kind of spices. But not the rubs and sauces from USA.
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brutus1964
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Joined: 01 Apr 2014
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 03 17 9:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is a link to a rub that I like for pork ribs. It was a little salty for my taste so I cut the salt in half when I make it.
It will give you a base to start with and you can make changes to suit your tastes.

http://www.thesmokering.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=4964&highlight=chris+rub

I would recommend the 3-2-1 method for the ribs at about 250 to 275. I usually spritz with apple juice about every hour and finish with a sweet sauce or honey but it isn't necessary.

I cook my chicken hot and fast at about 350 and spritz with a 50/50 water vinegar mix with kosher salt added and dissolved in the liquid. I use a sweet sauce to finish.
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BurnBern
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Joined: 17 Jul 2015
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Location: UK

PostPosted: Tue Oct 03 17 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

brutus1964 wrote:
Here is a link to a rub that I like for pork ribs. It was a little salty for my taste so I cut the salt in half when I make it.
It will give you a base to start with and you can make changes to suit your tastes.

http://www.thesmokering.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=4964&highlight=chris+rub

I would recommend the 3-2-1 method for the ribs at about 250 to 275. I usually spritz with apple juice about every hour and finish with a sweet sauce or honey but it isn't necessary.

I cook my chicken hot and fast at about 350 and spritz with a 50/50 water vinegar mix with kosher salt added and dissolved in the liquid. I use a sweet sauce to finish.


Thank you sooooo much. How long do you think chicken would take at those temps. Just trying to gauge the time to start as I’m going to do ribs and chicken for dinner on Friday
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brutus1964
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Joined: 01 Apr 2014
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 04 17 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BurnBern wrote:

How long do you think chicken would take at those temps. Just trying to gauge the time to start as I’m going to do ribs and chicken for dinner on Friday


It depends on the cut of chicken. I usually cook thighs or leg quarters and spritz about every 15-20 minutes if I'm cooking over direct coals. I also turn the chicken at this time as well. I don't have an exact time as I cook to 160F internal temp. It seems like about an hour or so.

Something else I have been doing lately with chicken is I make a brine with a cup of hot sauce and a cup of apple cider vinegar along with a 12 oz beer. I put the brine and chicken in a 1 gallon zip lock bag and let it marinate overnight then cook as described. I finish it with a sweet sauce and it is amazing. It takes on a little heat but not overly spicy.
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BurnBern
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09 17 8:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I did my first ever cook and in my eyes it was a huge success because I learnt so much.

I did 2 racks of ribs and some chicken legs. They were delicious but there is definitely room for improvement.

Things I learnt was to watch the coal base and to learn when to put another stick on as I almost lost my coal base and then I loaded to many sticks on and over shot the temps.

I also learnt what the thin blue smoke is and how to get it. The week before I did a test run and I was almost choking. I learnt here that my coal base was to small and my wood was smouldering if you like thus causing too much smoke. The sticks have to have some flames.

When the meat has reached the temp to check it and take it off.
Once I’ve taken it off the meat still cooks in its own heat until it starts to cool down.

The chicken once done I fired up the grill and crisped the chicken up with the skins on.

So all in all it was great fun and meat was great so much so my neighbor wants me to build him a smoker now.
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SmokingPiney
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Joined: 15 Aug 2015
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Location: South Jersey Pine Barrens

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10 17 5:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BurnBern wrote:
Well I did my first ever cook and in my eyes it was a huge success because I learnt so much.

I did 2 racks of ribs and some chicken legs. They were delicious but there is definitely room for improvement.

Things I learnt was to watch the coal base and to learn when to put another stick on as I almost lost my coal base and then I loaded to many sticks on and over shot the temps.

I also learnt what the thin blue smoke is and how to get it. The week before I did a test run and I was almost choking. I learnt here that my coal base was to small and my wood was smouldering if you like thus causing too much smoke. The sticks have to have some flames.

When the meat has reached the temp to check it and take it off.
Once I’ve taken it off the meat still cooks in its own heat until it starts to cool down.

The chicken once done I fired up the grill and crisped the chicken up with the skins on.

So all in all it was great fun and meat was great so much so my neighbor wants me to build him a smoker now.


Great to hear!

You will find as you progress that smoking and grilling is much more a journey than a destination. It's the thrill of trying out new cooks and methods, mastering them, and sharing them with your friends. There will always be another mountain to climb - another cook to try. Enjoy your journey and be sure to share it with friends. Very Happy
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IXL



Joined: 09 Apr 2008
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 10 17 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BurnBern wrote:
Well I did my first ever cook and in my eyes it was a huge success because I learnt so much.

I did 2 racks of ribs and some chicken legs. They were delicious but there is definitely room for improvement.

Things I learnt was to watch the coal base and to learn when to put another stick on as I almost lost my coal base and then I loaded to many sticks on and over shot the temps.

I also learnt what the thin blue smoke is and how to get it. The week before I did a test run and I was almost choking. I learnt here that my coal base was to small and my wood was smouldering if you like thus causing too much smoke. The sticks have to have some flames.

When the meat has reached the temp to check it and take it off.
Once I’ve taken it off the meat still cooks in its own heat until it starts to cool down.

The chicken once done I fired up the grill and crisped the chicken up with the skins on.

So all in all it was great fun and meat was great so much so my neighbor wants me to build him a smoker now.


It sounds like you are on your way!! You have learned more in one week than some folks here in Oklahoma do in 15 or 20 cooks. Sorry about your rub situation.
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Pit Boss
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Joined: 04 Sep 2008
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Location: Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina

PostPosted: Fri Oct 13 17 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Learning is the key to success! And it sounds as if you experienced both!!!

As for seasoning...I like the idea of forming a base line...use just salt & black pepper. Course salt & coarse grind pepper will make as tasty a barbecue as any seasoning blend. I like equal parts by volume...others may have their own favorite ratios.

I recommend using the S&P for the first few cooks, and anytime you cook a "new" protein. That does several things.

#1 ... It allows you to focus on your pit. Not having to worry about seasonings & rubs burning...anything that allows you to fully focus on learning how your new pit runs.

#2 ... It allows you to have that "control group". So when you do start using rubs & seasonings, you know what differences those seasonings actually made.

#3 ... You learn what the meat tastes like practically unadorned, and unmolested, by pungent spices. You may come to find that it tastes it's best when not hiding behind a curtain of rubs. Most times I like to use 3 or 4 ingredients from start to finish...1 part meat, 1 part smoke, 1 part salt, and 1 part pepper (sometimes I leave off the pepper). Simple seasonings allow the star of the show to shine.

Best of luck to you...you have alot of good eating ahead!
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BurnBern
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Joined: 17 Jul 2015
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13 17 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pit Boss wrote:
Learning is the key to success! And it sounds as if you experienced both!!!

As for seasoning...I like the idea of forming a base line...use just salt & black pepper. Course salt & coarse grind pepper will make as tasty a barbecue as any seasoning blend. I like equal parts by volume...others may have their own favorite ratios.

I recommend using the S&P for the first few cooks, and anytime you cook a "new" protein. That does several things.

#1 ... It allows you to focus on your pit. Not having to worry about seasonings & rubs burning...anything that allows you to fully focus on learning how your new pit runs.

#2 ... It allows you to have that "control group". So when you do start using rubs & seasonings, you know what differences those seasonings actually made.

#3 ... You learn what the meat tastes like practically unadorned, and unmolested, by pungent spices. You may come to find that it tastes it's best when not hiding behind a curtain of rubs. Most times I like to use 3 or 4 ingredients from start to finish...1 part meat, 1 part smoke, 1 part salt, and 1 part pepper (sometimes I leave off the pepper). Simple seasonings allow the star of the show to shine.

Best of luck to you...you have alot of good eating ahead!


Thank you for passing on your wisdom. I will do this for the next few cooks in the future.
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Snowsmoke
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Joined: 03 Apr 2012
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Location: Melrose, MA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 31 17 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aaron Franklin has some great Youtube videos you can watch on butchering and the part in his book about fire control really helped me learn that piece of the puzzle.

For my WSM, I really have cut back on the wood needed to give the food a touch of smoke/wood flavor at the end of the taste. I started very much like you with cloudy smoke.

My first rub was Magic Dust http://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/magic-barbecue-dust-122725

I learned quickly what I liked and didn't using that as a base plate. The idea of S & P to learn your cooker is genius too so if you have the time, I would do that and just sauce food post cooking.

One of the bbq voyages I just started with layering of rubs and grinding up nice finishing "dust"

Good luck on this endless ride!
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