FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 


Newbie at Welding

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Smoke Ring Forum Index -> Welding
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
avengethis



Joined: 19 Mar 2016
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Wed May 04 16 10:33 pm    Post subject: Newbie at Welding Reply with quote

So for my build I have decided it is time I learn how to weld. I am leaning towards something like the Lincoln Power Mig 180c so I can do flux core or gas. In my garage I feel like the flux might be the best choice to avoid the gases. Will something like this machine be able to handle the demand of probably 3/8" plating for the firebox and the amount of welding to do? If not do you guys have another suggestion to look into?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Smokin Mike
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 02 Dec 2008
Posts: 3144
Location: Winston-Salem, NC

PostPosted: Wed May 04 16 11:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sure some of the experts will chime in shortly to help with your question on the 3/8" welding. I just wanted to say there is no free ride with using gas vs flux core as far as fumes. The flux core will be smoky so either way you're going to need some ventilation.

Here's the data sheet on the Power Mig and it might help with some of your questions; http://www.lincolnelectric.com/assets/global/Products/K2473-2/e724.pdf
_________________
My current cookers: 80 gallon vertical tank
The Ultimate New Braunfels Makeover
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Flyingj
BBQ Fan


Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Posts: 272
Location: North Texas

PostPosted: Thu May 05 16 12:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sure the Lincoln is a quality welder but you will be somewhat limited welding 3/8". For single pass, they rate the welder for up to 3/8 with flux core only. The rating with gas/MIG is only 3/16". My choice would be the Millermatic 211 (mainly because that is what I use and have been very happy with it). It is rated for up to 3/8" with or without gas.

Over time, I think you will find that welding with a gas setup will give you excellent results on most applications. The Miller is a bit more expensive but with the current $100 rebate, it is very competitive to the Lincoln. This is just my opinion, I'm sure you will be happy with whatever choice you make.

http://www.weldingsuppliesfromioc.com/miller-millermatic-211-mig-welder-with-advanced-auto-set-907614
_________________
250 Gallon Trailer Build
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
k.a.m.
BBQ Mega Star


Joined: 12 Dec 2007
Posts: 25938
Location: Southeast Texas.

PostPosted: Thu May 05 16 12:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am a stick welder so I will leave the wire feed alone. I am with Mike which ever way you go you are gonna have fumes so get ready to leave the door open and maybe even a fan or two to move the air around.
_________________
Always remember slow and steady wins the race.

Hybrid Cooker
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Maniac
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 02 Oct 2010
Posts: 2432
Location: Pa

PostPosted: Thu May 05 16 1:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

k.a.m. wrote:
I am a stick welder so I will leave the wire feed alone. I am with Mike which ever way you go you are gonna have fumes so get ready to leave the door open and maybe even a fan or two to move the air around.

If you use a fan with gas do not put it pointed right where you are welding...will blow your shield away. flux vs gas , gas is my go to , stick if I'm welding outside. both Lincoln and miller make great machines go with your budget and how often you will have a use for welding after the build.
_________________
RF Smoker
20" disc
uds
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gandrfab
BBQ Fan


Joined: 08 Feb 2012
Posts: 190
Location: Edgewater fl

PostPosted: Thu May 05 16 5:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

k.a.m. wrote:
I am a stick welder so I will leave the wire feed alone. I am with Mike which ever way you go you are gonna have fumes so get ready to leave the door open and maybe even a fan or two to move the air around.

Even gas mig'n you get fumes.
When ever welding you need ventilation.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
k.a.m.
BBQ Mega Star


Joined: 12 Dec 2007
Posts: 25938
Location: Southeast Texas.

PostPosted: Thu May 05 16 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

gandrfab wrote:
k.a.m. wrote:
I am a stick welder so I will leave the wire feed alone. I am with Mike which ever way you go you are gonna have fumes so get ready to leave the door open and maybe even a fan or two to move the air around.

Even gas mig'n you get fumes.
When ever welding you need ventilation.

The red comment was merely stating that someone with more wire feed knowledge on the welder and metal thickness would be better suited to answer his question than me.
I am well aware of the fumes put off by welding with the different processes that is why I stated in blue which ever way you go get ready to leave the door open and maybe even have a fan or two to move the air around.
_________________
Always remember slow and steady wins the race.

Hybrid Cooker
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
TrailerBuilder
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 08 Feb 2010
Posts: 3147
Location: Springfield MO

PostPosted: Thu May 05 16 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think everyone agrees that there will be fumes Laughing I have 2 MIGs, a Miller 135 and a Miller 250. You have to decide what your future plans are for this machine. Are you going to build a cooker and then never use it again, or will you do some future projects with the machine. A 110v unit is nice, but you will be limited on its performance. Most duty cycles on 110v machines are 40%, meaning for every 10 mins, you can weld 4...if youre lucky. I have welded 1/2" plate with my 110v machine, but it was a long drawn out process. Beveled edges and multiple passes, tied in with the duty cycle killing it all the time made for a frustrating job, that if I would have had my big machine available, could have been done in less than 5 minutes. If youre just building a backyarder and that's it, you can get by easily enough with a smaller machine. Be good at multi tasking so you work on other aspects of the build while the machine is in the cool down cycle. Plan on multiple passes with the thicker materials. It will try your patience at times, but it can be done. If you have plans for future builds or projects, I would seriously try to step up to a 220v machine. The 211 like flyingj mentioned, is a killer machine. Whatever you buy, I would go Miller or Lincoln, and stay as far away from harbor freight as you can.

JM2CW
_________________
X2 Finished Build
Disco Time
Fire Pit
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
JLCBBQ
BBQ Fan


Joined: 10 Jun 2014
Posts: 164

PostPosted: Tue May 10 16 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I finally bought a MIG recently and researched Miller, Lincoln and Hobart's machines for about a solid month before finally finding a great Craigslist deal on a Miller 211. I have no regrets. The 180c seems to be a capable machine, and I'm sure you could accomplish any BBQ related build with it, but to efficiently accomplish safe welds on thicker steel, the Miller 211 is the way to go.

Resale on Miller machines is also something to consider. Lincoln makes the home depot/Lowes cheap version of their 180 class MIG for about $650 as well as a better built version, the 180c and 180 dual for $850 and $950. I don't think this is common knowledge to the local resale community however, so when you go to sell your 180c, people will assume it's just the same one Home Depot has and it'll be hard to sell for a decent price. A Miller 211, on the other hand, is the same machine no matter where you buy it and it is not uncommon for people to sell their used one for very close to what they originally bought it for.

If infinate voltage control is not a big issue for you, the Hobart 210 MVP is a very capable machine as well. The same company owns both Miller and Hobart, so a lot of their parts are the same.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Smoke Ring Forum Index -> Welding All times are GMT + 8 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group