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IT'S ALIVE!!!! (New smoker)

 
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ExperiencedRookie
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Joined: 29 Nov 2012
Posts: 54
Location: Fort Worth, TX

PostPosted: Thu Dec 17 15 5:21 am    Post subject: IT'S ALIVE!!!! (New smoker) Reply with quote

One of our new Oyler 1300's being built...I can't wait!!!!!!

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Harry Nutczak
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Joined: 01 Mar 2007
Posts: 8558
Location: The Northwoods

PostPosted: Thu Dec 17 15 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OUTSTANDING!
Are you getting the draft inducer fan add-on?
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ExperiencedRookie
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Joined: 29 Nov 2012
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Location: Fort Worth, TX

PostPosted: Fri Dec 18 15 8:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harry Nutczak wrote:
OUTSTANDING!
Are you getting the draft inducer fan add-on?


I wasn't planning on it...Is that something worth adding on? To be honest I've yet to cook on one of these but we decided to go with the Oyler's instead of building our own offset smokers for the new restaurant.

We're getting a total of 3-1300 Oyler's so we should be able to smoke a ridiculous amount of BBQ...
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qfanatic01
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Joined: 21 Oct 2009
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Location: Champlin, MN

PostPosted: Thu Dec 24 15 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's quite an investment. Especially for not ever cooking on one. I hope you or someone has a ton of experience and an established business!!! Otherwise a huge risk with a lot of money I hope someone can afford to lose? I look forward to seeing what you're doing with them. Please post more.
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Harry Nutczak
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Joined: 01 Mar 2007
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Location: The Northwoods

PostPosted: Thu Dec 24 15 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Holy Schitt!!

Are these going to be inside a building??

If so, I highly suggest the draft inducers, it'll help keep nuisance smoke down, and if you're investing $100K in pits, that few extra bucks is just icing on the cake
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ExperiencedRookie
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Joined: 29 Nov 2012
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Location: Fort Worth, TX

PostPosted: Sat Dec 26 15 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harry Nutczak wrote:
Holy Schitt!!

Are these going to be inside a building??

If so, I highly suggest the draft inducers, it'll help keep nuisance smoke down, and if you're investing $100K in pits, that few extra bucks is just icing on the cake


No, not inside. We'll be building a structure behind the existing restaurant space to house all of these smokers.
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ExperiencedRookie
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Location: Fort Worth, TX

PostPosted: Sat Dec 26 15 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

qfanatic01 wrote:
That's quite an investment. Especially for not ever cooking on one. I hope you or someone has a ton of experience and an established business!!! Otherwise a huge risk with a lot of money I hope someone can afford to lose? I look forward to seeing what you're doing with them. Please post more.


Well...it's not like I don't know what I'm doing...

"I look forward to seeing what you're doing with them." --We're going to cook a whole hell of a lot of BBQ with them! haha
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Harry Nutczak
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Joined: 01 Mar 2007
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Location: The Northwoods

PostPosted: Sat Dec 26 15 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My 700 is outside due to an insurance issue, my current insurer does not like anything that is "Solid Fuel" no matter what the UL safety ratings are.

I have been having some issues getting a proper draft and a good fire rolling sometimes due to wind, or temperature, The chimney needs to get hot to get a proper flow going upwards due to the pits unique reverse-flow design with the exhaust opening being at the bottom of the cook chamber.
I also see backflow when I close my doors, and it takes a bit to get things flowing the correct way again.
This is easier to accomplish with burning seasoned wood, but seasoned wood will stab you in the back with these pits, they like fresh cut wood.

I currently open my bypass to get things heated up, but that can waste a ton of heat, and also cause a fuel rich fire and embers floating in the air, which in turn causes black acrid smoke and a fire hazard.
A draft inducer will help get the flow going properly when you are trying to build heat, and it will also save you from breathing a buttload of smoke every time you open those doors.

Maybe get one of your pits with the inducer, and see if you like it, if you do not, I'll buy the draft fan from you.
I bet you get all three equipped with them.

Oh, get their 'Bean Pan" rack right away too. You can thank me later.
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Just remember that the toes you may step on during your climb to the top will also be attached to the a$$es you'll be forced to kiss on your way back down!
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ExperiencedRookie
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Joined: 29 Nov 2012
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Location: Fort Worth, TX

PostPosted: Sun Dec 27 15 1:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harry Nutczak wrote:
My 700 is outside due to an insurance issue, my current insurer does not like anything that is "Solid Fuel" no matter what the UL safety ratings are.

I have been having some issues getting a proper draft and a good fire rolling sometimes due to wind, or temperature, The chimney needs to get hot to get a proper flow going upwards due to the pits unique reverse-flow design with the exhaust opening being at the bottom of the cook chamber.
I also see backflow when I close my doors, and it takes a bit to get things flowing the correct way again.
This is easier to accomplish with burning seasoned wood, but seasoned wood will stab you in the back with these pits, they like fresh cut wood.

I currently open my bypass to get things heated up, but that can waste a ton of heat, and also cause a fuel rich fire and embers floating in the air, which in turn causes black acrid smoke and a fire hazard.
A draft inducer will help get the flow going properly when you are trying to build heat, and it will also save you from breathing a buttload of smoke every time you open those doors.

Maybe get one of your pits with the inducer, and see if you like it, if you do not, I'll buy the draft fan from you.
I bet you get all three equipped with them.

Oh, get their 'Bean Pan" rack right away too. You can thank me later.


Thanks Harry, like I said, never cooked on an Oyler but I have a ton of friends in the business that swear by them. I know it'll take a little time getting used to but right now our main pit is an offset stick burner with no temp gauges...so anything should be an upgrade...

I will definitely add the draft inducer and bean pan!

Thanks!
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qfanatic01
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Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 768
Location: Champlin, MN

PostPosted: Mon Dec 28 15 12:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ExperiencedRookie wrote:
qfanatic01 wrote:
That's quite an investment. Especially for not ever cooking on one. I hope you or someone has a ton of experience and an established business!!! Otherwise a huge risk with a lot of money I hope someone can afford to lose? I look forward to seeing what you're doing with them. Please post more.


Well...it's not like I don't know what I'm doing...

"I look forward to seeing what you're doing with them." --We're going to cook a whole hell of a lot of BBQ with them! haha


Wasn't meant as a dis, I don't know anything about your business and your post suggested lack of knowledge. I've seen many restaurants with persuasive partners loose everyone's money. Just bought 4k in chairs from a million dollar fail, only open 6 months. I wish I could run 3 of those, although a limited supply keeps a line at the door.
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Harry Nutczak
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Joined: 01 Mar 2007
Posts: 8558
Location: The Northwoods

PostPosted: Mon Dec 28 15 3:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am just awestruck at being able to start with three 1,800 series Oylers. I know what those cost new, and I've been wanting a pair of them for a few years now

Schitt,

I opened my place with a DPP-70, and an upright stumps of an odd size that the fabricator narfed for another customer, and I got it at a decent price.
I had less than $6K in working capital to get the rest of my equipment that I needed, plus the cost of licensing, insurance & initial inventory

Then I got into a heavily used Oyler that needed a ton of refurb work about 6-7 months after opening our place.
The shipper busted all the switches off, destroyed the temp controller, they even broke off the pipe for the grease drain.
So I traced all the wires, studied the wiring diagram for an hour or so, and it has been up and running since late 2010.

They are a stellar pit, heavy duty but not bullet-proof, they also dent easily when your snowplow guys hits them, But being in TX, you don;t get to deal with that often
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Just remember that the toes you may step on during your climb to the top will also be attached to the a$$es you'll be forced to kiss on your way back down!
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Grills Gone Wild
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Joined: 15 May 2010
Posts: 212
Location: Rockwall, Texas

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05 16 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Starting out with 3 Oylers. Now that is the cat's meow. I've had some experience with a Oyler 700 in a restaurant, so if you need some help just give me a shout.
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ExperiencedRookie
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Joined: 29 Nov 2012
Posts: 54
Location: Fort Worth, TX

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06 16 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harry Nutczak wrote:
I am just awestruck at being able to start with three 1,800 series Oylers. I know what those cost new, and I've been wanting a pair of them for a few years now

Schitt,

I opened my place with a DPP-70, and an upright stumps of an odd size that the fabricator narfed for another customer, and I got it at a decent price.
I had less than $6K in working capital to get the rest of my equipment that I needed, plus the cost of licensing, insurance & initial inventory

Then I got into a heavily used Oyler that needed a ton of refurb work about 6-7 months after opening our place.
The shipper busted all the switches off, destroyed the temp controller, they even broke off the pipe for the grease drain.
So I traced all the wires, studied the wiring diagram for an hour or so, and it has been up and running since late 2010.

They are a stellar pit, heavy duty but not bullet-proof, they also dent easily when your snowplow guys hits them, But being in TX, you don;t get to deal with that often


My wife and I opened out food truck the last week of February 2015 with less than $100 in our bank account...We leased a food truck outside of a bar and I was cooking on a huge off-set smoker that my uncle passed down to me. To say we've been blessed is an understatement...we've had overwhelming support from our area and from the greater DFW area in general.

Somehow we wound up in a spot where we are able to partner with some incredible folks to open our dream restaurant. We probably only needed 2 Oyler's but my business partner wanted a 3rd just in case...without getting into too many details, he can make those kinds of decisions very easily and it doesn't affect our partnership because he is also the building owner and covering the whole build-out, equipment, etc....

Crazy...I've never heard of a better scenario but all I know is they're great partners who really gave us a great opportunity to grow our business.

Also, Harry I asked about the draft inducer and the guys at J&R said I shouldn't need it here in Texas...so I'm going to follow up on that but they said it would be unnecessary for us...
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Harry Nutczak
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 06 16 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ExperiencedRookie wrote:


Also, Harry I asked about the draft inducer and the guys at J&R said I shouldn't need it here in Texas...so I'm going to follow up on that but they said it would be unnecessary for us...


That's always nice to hear, They didn't jump at the chance to sell you something that you don't need.

If you ever need to get a fire roaring, just open that bypass for a minute or two, And when the guys at JR say you need fresh cut wood, believe them!
Seasoned wood, split small in an oyler will make it belch black smoke at you all day long
_________________
Just remember that the toes you may step on during your climb to the top will also be attached to the a$$es you'll be forced to kiss on your way back down!
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ExperiencedRookie
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Joined: 29 Nov 2012
Posts: 54
Location: Fort Worth, TX

PostPosted: Thu Jan 07 16 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harry Nutczak wrote:
ExperiencedRookie wrote:


Also, Harry I asked about the draft inducer and the guys at J&R said I shouldn't need it here in Texas...so I'm going to follow up on that but they said it would be unnecessary for us...


That's always nice to hear, They didn't jump at the chance to sell you something that you don't need.

If you ever need to get a fire roaring, just open that bypass for a minute or two, And when the guys at JR say you need fresh cut wood, believe them!
Seasoned wood, split small in an oyler will make it belch black smoke at you all day long


Really...any idea why that is? something to do with the reverse-flow? I'm very particular about the age/seasoning of our wood now and I've always loved the drier the better. I will have to test this out once I can get my hands on our Oyler.
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Harry Nutczak
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Joined: 01 Mar 2007
Posts: 8558
Location: The Northwoods

PostPosted: Thu Jan 07 16 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ExperiencedRookie wrote:
Harry Nutczak wrote:
ExperiencedRookie wrote:


Also, Harry I asked about the draft inducer and the guys at J&R said I shouldn't need it here in Texas...so I'm going to follow up on that but they said it would be unnecessary for us...


That's always nice to hear, They didn't jump at the chance to sell you something that you don't need.

If you ever need to get a fire roaring, just open that bypass for a minute or two, And when the guys at JR say you need fresh cut wood, believe them!
Seasoned wood, split small in an oyler will make it belch black smoke at you all day long


Really...any idea why that is? something to do with the reverse-flow? I'm very particular about the age/seasoning of our wood now and I've always loved the drier the better. I will have to test this out once I can get my hands on our Oyler.


It's just the way they work, I had trouble believing that too, until I added seasoned wood that was split into that firebox, and had the nastiest black smoke I'd ever seen.

These things like burning wood so green that you should have water dripping out of the ends of the log.
If you have a bed of coals, use the biggest damn unsplit logs that you can fit in that firebox, and it will be a happy pit.
I believe it is due to the round concrete firebox reflecting the heat back into the wood, and if it is well seasoned, too much wood will be burning at once, and there is not enough oxygen to support such a fuel-rich fire, hence black acrid smoke and 1,800 pounds of ruined meat
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Just remember that the toes you may step on during your climb to the top will also be attached to the a$$es you'll be forced to kiss on your way back down!
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