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Fresh cut fries
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Kryptonite BBQ



Joined: 13 Jul 2014
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 06 15 4:59 am    Post subject: Fresh cut fries Reply with quote

Hi just opening a BBQ a roadside spot and was wondering does anyone do fresh cut fries and if so how long do you soak them also once par fried do they need refrigerated or can they be kept in a bucket until needed thanks
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Harry Nutczak
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 06 15 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I want to do them, but they take up too much space for what we have.

It is best to blanch them before use (Quick dip in a fryer, hold, then finish as needed) But many go from cutting, soaking to single fry with good results.

Moisture in potatoes does change with the seasons, so you may see varying results in fresh cut fries
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Kryptonite BBQ



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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07 15 8:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Harry have you ever tried par fry then into the cvap to hold them? Love my cvap always looking for uses for it
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Harry Nutczak
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08 15 3:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kryptonite BBQ wrote:
Thanks Harry have you ever tried par fry then into the cvap to hold them? Love my cvap always looking for uses for it


No, I have not. My CVAP's are typically stuffed full of meat with the texture settings very low.
I would feel more comfortable completely frying them, then hot-holding. I Believe that your texture setting would need to be near maxed out for those.

I want to do fresh cut fries, but I am already buried with work and do not want to add any more on top of what is already going on
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Grills Gone Wild
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08 15 7:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Typically you can blanch them and have them sit by the fryer until single orders come in.
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YardFullOfOak
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08 15 9:34 am    Post subject: Frozen Reply with quote

You will most likely get better and more consistent results if you start from a frozen product.
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1MoreFord
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09 15 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm viewing this from the consumers side. I've never had fresh cut fries that I've liked. All I've ever had were dark in color and soggy textured. The color really doesn't matter but the texture sure does. I much prefer a product similar to the McDonald's fries of old fresh out of the fryer.
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SoEzzy
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09 15 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Double cooked french fries are a good product IMO.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/double-fried-french-fries-recipe.html
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RodinBangkok
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09 15 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seems easy to do fresh cut, but its like many things the ingredients are simple but the techniques and processes are more difficult to nail, and they take time, you can’t just fry up a bunch and hold them, first fry yes but not second.

Process consistency is very important, so is the storage history of the potatoes. If they were stored incorrectly they make sugar, and this means dark and sometimes soggy fries.

Soggy can be due to low temp in the final cook, not letting the oil recover to temp, or overloading the fryer resulting in a big temp drop. Soggy is also a sign of too long a hold time after final fry.

Holding fries for any length of time is almost impossible, they just loose that crunch that goes with fresh out of the basket. So don’t try and hold long times, if holding, don’t cover, the best is what you see at most fast food places open area with a heat lamp. Don’t cover them when serving, they will generate steam and loose their crunch.

You can easily par fry a big quantity and just hold next to the fryer, then final fry as needed. No need to hold them at temp, they will be fine at room temp during service, you can fridge store them a day or so no issues also.

They are quite easy to make once you have your process down, but they are fussy and need to be made fresh to get the best fries. If you have limited staff or they can’t follow the process instructions to the letter then fresh cut fries may not be for you.

We do Belgian Frite’s and we get a premium for them as they stand out like day and night to a frozen fry, but it takes time and commitment to make them right day in and day out.
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Mr Tony's BBQ
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09 15 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1MoreFord wrote:
I'm viewing this from the consumers side. I've never had fresh cut fries that I've liked. All I've ever had were dark in color and soggy textured. The color really doesn't matter but the texture sure does. I much prefer a product similar to the McDonald's fries of old fresh out of the fryer.


Ding Ding!! DITTO!!
We use a coated fry - frozen...A little more money up front, but actually hold quite well for at least 10 min. under lamp! Even par-frying until just a light color, rest full basket above fryer, then re-drop when line appears.
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Kryptonite BBQ



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 10 15 9:44 am    Post subject: Thanks guys Reply with quote

mr tony what brand/ fry do you use we have been catering and just set up a roadside joint in my auto repair shop lot it's crazy busy and searching on how to bring in fries again thanks everyone
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BUGSnBBQ
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 11 15 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

1MoreFord wrote:
I'm viewing this from the consumers side. I've never had fresh cut fries that I've liked.

I'll also say this from a customers point of view (my own, of course) - I've never had a frozen fry that I truly liked, except McD's back in the day when they still used lard (or whatever they used). When I go out to eat, I'll gladly pay a premium price for hand-cut fries if they're cooked correctly, like I do at home. I know home vs 'raunt cooking is apples to oranges, but a crappy side will make the entire meal less desirable, no matter how good the main is.
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1MoreFord
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 11 15 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BUGSnBBQ wrote:
....When I go out to eat, I'll gladly pay a premium price for hand-cut fries if they're cooked correctly, like I do at home.....


My point exactly. I've never had good well cooked hand cut fries at a 'raunt. They've all been limp and soggy and dark brown. I'll gladly take good well cooked frozen fries over that any day. I agree the Mcdonalds fries when cooked in beef tallow were the best of the lot of frozen fries.
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qfanatic01
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12 15 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Moisture content is a huge factor in fresh cut fries. We have had fresh cut fries of one sort or another since opening 8 plus years ago. We evolved based on supply and pricing. Idaho russet potatoes are grown in volcanic low moisture soil and are prized for there frying characteristics and fluffy baked potatoes. Several years back there was a shortage and we were unable to get them. We were stuck with soggy fries created by russets from other growing regions. As it is most people eat their fries first because they really only have a very short window of optimum quality. We have gone with fresh wedged B red potatoes. They are still tasty when not crispy. They are our number one selling side. We go through up to 1/2 ton a week between all our potato dishes at 300.00 to 350.00. We source them locally in season and still get them from regional sources year round from a wholesaler, not from a distributor. Not practical for everyone. I think you would still have better margins through the distributor though. We don't need a freezer and you can't touch the profit margins with frozen.

We cut and hold in water, pre-cook for 8 minutes and drop back down for 1 minute to order. I have a couple of different seasoning blends to finish.
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Kryptonite BBQ



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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12 15 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You guys all rock thanks for all the ideas and info I very much appreciate it. Very Happy
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feldon30
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 13 15 4:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Double-cooking makes a massive difference. First trip to the oil gets the interior heating up. Second trip sets the exterior color and finishes the interior cooking. Double-cooked fries should be perfectly golden brown on the outside with an interior like fluffy mashed potatoes. Double-cooked fries are a trademark of Belgian restaurants. Not sure how practical this cooking technique is in a BBQ restaurant workflow.

Now I've got a picture forming in my head of an automated submersion system with an advanced timer that would heat the oil to 325°F, drop the fries for X minutes, pull them out, heat the oil to 375°F, and then drop the fries for X minutes and then pull them out. Whoever develops such a machine might not become rich, but they'd be a hero to restaurant owners. Smile

If someone has several bays of oil, they could keep them at different temperatures -- 325 and 375 -- and then use typical timers.

*Disclaimer: I have never worked in the industry.*
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Louie
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 14 15 2:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fresh cut are definitely best,

rinse, soak over night, blanch let em cool and cook to order.
(little more to it than that, but that's the basics. Wink )
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Mr Tony's BBQ
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15 15 7:26 pm    Post subject: Re: Thanks guys Reply with quote

Kryptonite BBQ wrote:
mr tony what brand/ fry do you use we have been catering and just set up a roadside joint in my auto repair shop lot it's crazy busy and searching on how to bring in fries again thanks everyone


I believe they are called "platinum..something or another, premium coated fries"...lol...I get them from restaurant depot.....a tan box with a black banner across the top... Sorry dude, just bought more the other day...tossed box, and am too exhausted to recall exact name Sad Been going full bore 7 days a week, somethings gonna break, I think it's gonna be me Shocked Confused Shocked Shocked
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Harry Nutczak
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 16 15 3:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

it is my understanding that "Burbank Russets" are the spuds you want for frying.
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YardFullOfOak
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 18 15 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

feldon30 wrote:
Double-cooking makes a massive difference. First trip to the oil gets the interior heating up. Second trip sets the exterior color and finishes the interior cooking. Double-cooked fries should be perfectly golden brown on the outside with an interior like fluffy mashed potatoes. Double-cooked fries are a trademark of Belgian restaurants. Not sure how practical this cooking technique is in a BBQ restaurant workflow.


That's it!

There is no other way to correctly cook french fries than double -cooking. They have to be cooked that way.

The main reason why McDonald's fries were typically better than Burger King fries before Burger King went to coated fries in the late nineties was that McDonald's staff typically followed the cooking instructions for the fries, which called for double-cooking, whereas Burger King staff didn't care and skipped the intermediate step.

In Europe, you can buy a Belgian brand called Lutosa which makes an excellent frozen fry. I don't think it is available in the United States.

Unless you can constantly monitor your fresh potatoes for sugar and moisture levels, there is no way you can get a similar consistent high-quality product with fresh potatoes.

Btw, a dark brown, sagging product which derives its taste from old burnt oil and potato skin is not what a french fry is supposed to be.

Peanut oil makes the best fries, and a highly refined oil is supposedly safe for those with peanut allergy.
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