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clarified butter question

 
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Rinngrizz
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 02 15 12:50 am    Post subject: clarified butter question Reply with quote

thought this might be a good place to put this question and I kinda feel like a fool asking it but......

How does one make clarified butter?

I do more cast iron cooking, but would love to have some in reserve for when I cook. I tried looking up on the net for a good answer, but couldnt really find any good pictorials. Is it really as simple as melting it and scooping out the fatty white material and reserving the rest???
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pafisher
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 02 15 2:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

yep its that easy ,, melt butter,, skim the foamy stuff off the top.. then use the clarified butter until you reach the white milky stuff that stays at the bottom,, just throw that stuff away.
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BBcue-z
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 02 15 4:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Or you can use this stuff "butter-flavored oil"; it's great for cooking on the flat top and cast iron. It has a very nice buttery flavor and it does not burn, since it has no milk solids. I get it at the restaurant supply store, but Costco business center sells it and Smart and Final has a smaller size of it. There are several brands and they’re all just as good.
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It's also great on chicken and Turkey skin, since it contains no milk solids, it doesn't discolor the skin just gives nice and brown glossy look.
I agree with pafisher on making clarified butter though.
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SoEzzy
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 30 15 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For the work of clarifying butter better to use unsalted butter, warm in a heavy pan until the milk solids rise as a foam, simmer gently until no more foam rises, remove pan from the heat and skim the foam off the top, you can save or discard the foam, you can use it in bread, cakes, polenta, rice, or porridge.

Once you have skimmed the solids off, you can strain into the storage container, use a fine mesh strainer, and either a filter paper or a cloth, pour the still warm ghee, (clarified butter) through.

In Northern climes, you often don't need to refrigerate, but if your ambient temperatures are above 60° most of the time, then keep it in the fridge, for 4 - 6 months, refill as needed, when you pour more new ghee in, just stir the mixed old and new together, as the warm ghee melts the cold.

IMO the butter flavored oil is the worst of both worlds, it's not really like a butter flavor, and it's not just oil, not my favorite either way! Wink
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pyper
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 21 15 12:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

pafisher wrote:
until you reach the white milky stuff that stays at the bottom,, just throw that stuff away.


I cook grits in that stuff.
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hotch



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PostPosted: Tue Jul 21 15 2:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could also just buy Ghee. I like it due to the flavor profile. Still has high smoke point
From Wikipedia:

Ghee, although a type of clarified butter, differs slightly in its production. The process of creating traditional clarified butter is complete once the water is evaporated and the fat (clarified butter) is separated from the milk solids. However, the production of ghee includes simmering the butter along with the milk solids so that they caramelize, which makes it nutty-tasting and aromatic.
Ghee is an ideal fat for deep frying because its smoke point (where its molecules begin to break down) is 250 °C (482 °F), which is well above typical cooking temperatures of around 200 °C (392 °F) and above that of most vegetable oils.
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