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FINISHED - Making a griddle?

 
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TonyMo
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Joined: 03 Jun 2011
Posts: 53
Location: Southwest ONTARIO

PostPosted: Wed Feb 08 12 9:00 am    Post subject: FINISHED - Making a griddle? Reply with quote

Greetings,
I am looking for your input.
I have been considering a griddle for my gas grill. I know you can buy them but they are expensive, especially with shipping and they are not an exact fit. My gas grill surface is 15" X 26".

I would like a large surface so you can make bacon/eggs/hashbrowns etc for the whole family or guys at the hunt camp all at once or a whole bunch of pancakes.

So, I was thinking, could I build one from regular plate steel.
First of all, anything wrong with cooking on steel plate? I mean once the mill scale is ground off and finished up with scotch pads or sandpaper and seasoned like cast iron pans.

Next, how thick? I realize the heat could cause it to warp. Would 1/4" thick work ok. I was thinking of welding "V" angle to the bottom to help keep it flat. Plus, adding some sides and back around the perimeter of the plate could also help.

Other design elements I was thinking was to add another piece of angle to the front to act as a grease trough, that could drain into a can or something at one end.

Also, some handles on the sides for lifting/moving.

I have a Hobart 210 MVP welder and a Hypertherm 45 plasma cutter. I have a local steel supplier.

Thanks for your help.


Last edited by TonyMo on Wed Apr 11 12 8:59 am; edited 1 time in total
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Blazer
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Joined: 07 Sep 2011
Posts: 254
Location: southeast ohio

PostPosted: Wed Feb 08 12 9:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tonymo someone did one on here awhile back but i couldn't find it. I believe they used 3/8. If you get the scale off it i wouldn't think it would be any different than a disco, season it up and good to go. Very Happy
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TonyMo
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Joined: 03 Jun 2011
Posts: 53
Location: Southwest ONTARIO

PostPosted: Wed Feb 08 12 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your input. Razz
You said, "disco" I was like WTF? Stuck in the 70's? But then I did a search and now I see what you are talking about. I have never seen those before. Embarassed

I did a search prior to posting but didn't find anything about anyone actually building a griddle.
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Blazer
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Location: southeast ohio

PostPosted: Wed Feb 08 12 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here it is.
www.thesmokering.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=37655&sid...
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TrailerBuilder
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Joined: 08 Feb 2010
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08 12 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I dont see why you couldnt build one easily enough. Get it good and clean and keep it seasoned. Handles would be pretty easy really, some round stock heated and bent to shape or some horse shoes, could do anything really. Good luck on it and post some pics of the completed job.
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Catman
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Location: Fullerton, CA

PostPosted: Wed Feb 08 12 12:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You sure can make one from regular plate steel.
25 years ago I worked in a cafe where we had a carbon steel gas griddle. Cooked great, and well scraped & oiled, there was no problem with rust.
In fact, to this day, the vast majority of commercial grills are carbon steel. They are typically 3/4" to 1" thick, but for portability, you can make a thinner version.
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TonyMo
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Location: Southwest ONTARIO

PostPosted: Thu Feb 09 12 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your help.
I will post some photos when I get started.
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dunnjaz
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Joined: 30 Aug 2011
Posts: 70

PostPosted: Fri Feb 10 12 8:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was amazed to see this topic this evening.
I cooked on my disc this week and thought that one fixed on my patio would be nice to have.
I am going to start mine this weekend. I was going to build it and try it out before I posted in case it did not work.
I plan on taking it a few steps further than a plain griddle.

I plan on taking my 6" burners off of my stove and starting from the ground up.
I plan on mounting the burners on top of a metal box (All made of 1\8")
The metal box will turn into a cajun microwave.
Let me do a little art work and I'll post my ideas.
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dunnjaz
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 10 12 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is what I was thinking of.

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TonyMo
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Location: Southwest ONTARIO

PostPosted: Wed Apr 11 12 2:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am back with photos of my build.

I went to my local steel supplier. He cut me a piece of 1/4" thick steel plate, 15"X26". I also got 3 sections of 1/4" thick X 2" wide for the sides. Cost $27.00



I took a flap disc to the top and ground off the mill scale until I got it shiny.



I have a Hobart 210MVP welder. I used ER 70S-6 .030" solid wire and argon/CO2 mix shielding gas.
Now, to weld on the sides. I decided to weld the inside perimeter. I knew there would be a problem with the long welds and the heat distortion. So, I welded on the back first. I made welds about 2" long. I did a 2" weld on the left side, then the right, then in the middle to try and disapate the heat. I think it's called "stitch welding."






But, as you can see, it still moved out of 90 degrees by about an 1/8th of an inch. I have highlighted the edge of my square in yellow. Not a big deal for this project.


I ground the welds smooth.

Next the grease trough. I tooke a piece of 1.5 inch angle and cut it to about 27 inches long. I used my cheap 4"X6" China bandsaw (love that thing) and cut an angled piece off the length of one side. I attached this angled slope under the front edge with a few long tack welds. This would allow for the grease to flow toward the right side. I drilled a hole to allow the grease to drain into a can. I capped the ends off with small pieces of metal. I hope I explained that right. I didn't take a photo of this step.

Now, what to do for the handles? I was in Princess Auto (the Harbour Freight of Canada) and saw chipping hammers on sale. I liked the coiled handles so I bought two and cut the heads off. I don't have a bender large enough to just bend it 90 deg. So, I cut off a few inches, welded it to the side and then welded the coiled handle section on at 90 deg.





The parts that would NOT come into contact with food, I painted with black high heat paint.

All done. It weighs about 35 pounds. I seasoned it with some Crisco and put it on the gas grill on low for about an hour. I let it cool overnight and the next day I did a "test" cook of a pound of bacon.
Of course there was a lot of bacon grease.
PROBLEM: I had not thought about "capillary" action.
I only attached the grease trough to the underside with a few welds, not the entire length. The capillary action of the grease came under and between the base and trough. So, I now have a nice bacon grease stain on my deck. Embarassed
So, back to the shop and I welded the entire length of the grease trough to the bottom with the same "stitch" technique.
You know how they say that when welding properly it should sound like bacon frying. Well, now it also smelled like bacon frying. Very Happy

Anyway, the family and I were up at our cottage/camp for the Easter weekend and I tried it out for breakfast. Worked great! It takes about 10 minutes to preheat and gets very hot. One of those infra-red thermometers would come in handy. I had brown sugar/maple breakfast sausage and they burned a little because of the sugar content.



But, overall I am pleased. Not a bad job for a nooby welder like me.

I have never made Philly Cheesesteak. I think that will be my next cook.

I welcome your suggestions on how to improve this project or any questions you may have.[/img]
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Catman
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Location: Fullerton, CA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 11 12 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Every once in a while I come across a design that defies my natural tendency to improve upon it. Your griddle is one of those. Ideal size, weight, fit and function. You nailed it! Very Happy
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Beertooth
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 19 12 5:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very cool idea!

Nothing like a good flat top griddle.

Nice job, I might have to copy it. Very Happy
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GF
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 19 12 7:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TonyMo, some how I missed this post. Embarassed
The griddle looks great. Very Happy
Nice design and nice work, enjoy it.
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TonyMo
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Location: Southwest ONTARIO

PostPosted: Thu Apr 19 12 11:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for the comments. Very Happy
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Smokin Big D
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Location: Northeast Nebraska

PostPosted: Fri Apr 20 12 7:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good job. It looks great!
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Jarhead
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 28 12 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I bought one from Amazon about a year and a half ago. I think it is a Blackstone.
An IR thermometer is almost a necessity.
I've used it a few times, mostly for hunting and fishing camps. You can do all kinds of things on it, but mostly breakfast.

The base.

The burners.

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tanglediver
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Location: southern California

PostPosted: Fri May 04 12 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a cool project! Soon as I get caught up....
.....

...well if I ever get caught up, I'ld love to make me one! Very Happy
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