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Best Painting Process?

 
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HogsCall
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 14 14 11:29 am    Post subject: Best Painting Process? Reply with quote

What is the best process to go about painting your smoker? Is it better to bake the paint on the pit while its fired up or just spray the paint on a cold pit? If baking the paint on is best, what's the process for doing so? Or does it depend on the type of paint being used? I've seen on here where people have gone about it both ways, and I would like to know which process works best. If it matters, I'll be using the rustoleum high temp paint. Thanks for any and all help!
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SoEzzy
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 14 14 1:06 pm    Post subject: Re: Best Painting Process? Reply with quote

HogsCall wrote:
What is the best process to go about painting your smoker?


Depends on the paint.

Quote:
Is it better to bake the paint on the pit while its fired up or just spray the paint on a cold pit?


I love a well prepared, primed, smooth painted, baked on paint job! Rather than just a quick rattle can job.

Quote:
If baking the paint on is best, what's the process for doing so? Or does it depend on the type of paint being used?


Consult a paint shop for what they can do for you.

Quote:
I've seen on here where people have gone about it both ways, and I would like to know which process works best. If it matters, I'll be using the rustoleum high temp paint. Thanks for any and all help!


Looks like they don't recommend baking either the high heat or the ultra high heat on the Rust-oleum site!
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Smokin Mike
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 14 14 7:55 pm    Post subject: Re: Best Painting Process? Reply with quote

HogsCall wrote:
If it matters, I'll be using the rustoleum high temp paint. Thanks for any and all help!


The Rustoleum High Heat product is about the easiest to use out there. Just follow the instructions on the can and you'll be fine. BTW, it says to wait 24 hours before heating.

Also, the word on the internet is that the spray version of this paint doesn't give as good of a finished look as the liquid product that you brush on.... probably due to them having to thin down the paint to get it out the spray nozzle. I don't know this first hand as I've always used the non-spray product.
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Wreckless
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 14 14 10:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been using the Rustoleum Satin Black applied over a commercial blast for quite some time with very good results. A commercial (or even better but not necessary White metal blast) is essential for long lasting paint adherence as it removes mill scale for anyone using HR plate and sets up a profile for the paint to adhere to. Some here such as k.a.m. also use a primer but I believe that is more due to the brand / type of paint recommendations. Rustoleum high heat does not require a primer. However, there is a bit of info left out in the instructions listed on the can. It states "Ready to use" After having repaired a new firebox paint job that had peeled, I consulted Rustoleum tech dept. for additional info. It turned out the pit owner was firing up his brand new virgin painted firebox using charcoal starter inside the FB creating a mini bonfire. Nevertheless, the Rusto tech folks informed me that the paint should go through a "Cure" process before applying the heat a FB will be subject to though the process is not needed for the cooker body. The process goes something like this... a small fire bringing temp on FB walls to about 250F for 1/2 hr and then let cool. Again at around 350F and once more at normal use temps. I purchased an el cheapo infra red heat indicator / gun (?) for around $10 at HF. I now cure my fireboxes in this manner before finding the cooker a good home and have had zero problems / reports of problems, actually a few raves down the road as to how well the FB paint has held up over time. Possibly TMI here but hope it helps those that are planning to go down the Rusto paint route and the blast suggestions are for any paint. Lastly, FWIW... Smokin Mike is absolutely correct in that the rattle can is not repeatable to the liquid quart version, mucho difference in color and finish. I use a small aerosol spray pump attached to a paint holder for any touch ups and apples with no difference from original using the qt paint . (unit can be found at any Lowes or HD paint dept for around $10) Good luck, hope this helped.
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HogsCall
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 15 14 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really appreciate all the helpful info. I have a couple quarts of the rustoleum so I will not be using the cans. You guys would recommend just brushing it on rather than using a paint sprayer to spray it on? Also, I'm not so sure a professional sand blasting is an option. I'm on a fairly tight budget. Would a grinder do any good? My pit has never been painted. It has lived in a garage up until the last couple months and then just under a tarp and now there are some rust spots on my pit, so I know I'm going to have to get that stuff off and had planned on taking a grinder to it. Would grinding the rust off be ok to do before painting? I know it's not near as good as a sand blast job. Once again I really appreciate all the help.
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k.a.m.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 15 14 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HogsCall, I believe we all know about tight budgets now a days.
If you do not get the metal to at least a grey metal blast expect paint failure it will happen over time. There is mill scale that may be left on some of the iron that over time will release and cause paint failure, and while you may get the metal clean to some extent you cannot get the profile needed for a DTM paint to react to the bare metal like it should.
Long story short if you cannot afford the blast then get it as clean as possible and paint your cooker knowing you did the best you could with what you had to work with.
As far as brush/roller or spray? If at all possible I would spray starting with a light tack coat followed by a cover coat.
I hope this helps. Very Happy
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HogsCall
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 16 14 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I apologize for all the questions, but I just want to get this done as good as I can. How big of a factor is humidity? I know it plays a roll, but at what point is it too humid to paint? I live in south tx and the air is so thick you wear it. I just don't want to put a paint job on it and have it just peel right off because of the high humidity. Once again, I apologize for all the questions and I really really appreciate all your help.
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k.a.m.
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 16 14 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the dew point and surface temperature of the metal are within 5° of each other the metal will sweat and paint failure is eminent. This is usually when you are experiencing higher than normal humidity but other factors can be involved as well. Most paints can be applied in up to 80% to 90% humidity if your dew point and metal temps are with in reason.
I hope this helps. Very Happy
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BUGSnBBQ
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 16 14 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What about using an acid wash to remove the scale? I've painted a few rusty things over the years, and Phosphoric acid, with a bit of scrubbing, works well. You do need to neutralize it with baking soda before painting.

Just an idea, take it FWIW.

HogsCall wrote:
I apologize for all the questions

Don't apologize. We (especially ME Laughing ) need to learn from the smarter peoples Laughing
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k.a.m.
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 16 14 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While acid will take care of the scale and slow the rust ( not stop it) I am not a big fan of introducing my cookers to acid. I have read where some folks have done it but I would rather just wire wheel and know I am gonna re-paint down the road.
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HogsCall
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 17 14 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok sounds good. I sure appreciate all the help. I'm just gonna do the best I can and hope for the best. Hopefully i wont have anymore questions. But if i do i know where to go. Once again, thanks!
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cloud1771
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 18 14 4:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I plan to do the rust-o-lium high heat or ultra high heat.

But do you paint the inside of the smoker or coat the inside with any thing?

Also about how long do you thing the paint would last on a smoker that is kept in a shed?
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Smokin Mike
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 18 14 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cloud1771 wrote:
I plan to do the rust-o-lium high heat or ultra high heat.

But do you paint the inside of the smoker or coat the inside with any thing?

Also about how long do you thing the paint would last on a smoker that is kept in a shed?


Don't paint the inside. Season the inside of the cooker just like you would a cast iron skillet. Use vegetable shortening or a vegetable based cooking spray then let it cook out for an hour or two at 350° or so.

I painted my cooker with Rustoleum high heat back in late 2008 after I inherited it. I've kept it sheltered and/or tarped and the paint has held up just fine. Now the firebox is a different story. It gets stressed with all the heat and requires a bit more maintenance. I'm lucky to get two years without having to monkey around with the firebox.

The key is preparation. If you take the time to make sure the surface is clean of rust, old paint, grease and so on you'll get good service out of your paint job.
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HogsCall
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 18 14 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kam, can I ask why not use some type of acid to help slow the rust? Wouldn't it be ok as long as its used on the outside? Or is there something I'm not thinking of that would be a big reason not to use an acid?
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k.a.m.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 18 14 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HogsCall wrote:
Kam, can I ask why not use some type of acid to help slow the rust? Wouldn't it be ok as long as its used on the outside? Or is there something I'm not thinking of that would be a big reason not to use an acid?

I never said not use it I said I said I am not a big fan of it. In my area acid preps such as Ospho and the like do little to help with slowing rust that have already started to decay the metal. They are messy and if they hit shiny metal can sit for days without drying these areas will have to be rinsed with water so more prep is needed. Once dried it leaves a white powdery residue that needs to be brushed off again more prep work.
Make your own choice I do not care for it. Smile
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auto5man
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 21 14 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very informative thread!
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