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What is the best cut of beef to make PIT BEEF sammiches!!!
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Lump
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 15 10 7:39 pm    Post subject: What is the best cut of beef to make PIT BEEF sammiches!!! Reply with quote

would this be a sirloin roast? smoke at 220 till rare and slice??

Thanks Bill
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Mr Tony's BBQ
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 15 10 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like chuck roast 225 all day with a pan of seasoned liquid in smoker, 190 to slice, 200 pull! Cheap, can buy small or large, turns to butta!
Ribeye may be quite a bit more $, but if you want quick and rare, it wins in my world hands down!
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cowboy4life
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 15 10 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i have had alot of success with eye of round, cooked to rare / med. - rare.
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RiverSmoke



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 16 10 4:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A clod would be a fair choice.
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Huey
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 16 10 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Top round is traditional, but since it's expensive, I've been known to use bottom round. With bottom round, you just have to watch for veins of tough meat/gristle in the roast.


Don't forget the tiger sauce (half mayo/half horsey works for me).

One other thing: Pit beef is grilled, traditionally, not smoked. I like to use direct heat on each side of the roast until a crust forms, then switch to indirect heat until the temp hits about 145.

Rest, slice thin, serve with onions and the sauce on a Kaiser roll.
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Lump
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17 10 1:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Huey.
Thank you !!!!!!!


Huey wrote:
Top round is traditional, but since it's expensive, I've been known to use bottom round. With bottom round, you just have to watch for veins of tough meat/gristle in the roast.


Don't forget the tiger sauce (half mayo/half horsey works for me).

One other thing: Pit beef is grilled, traditionally, not smoked. I like to use direct heat on each side of the roast until a crust forms, then switch to indirect heat until the temp hits about 145.

Rest, slice thin, serve with onions and the sauce on a Kaiser roll.

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Soapm
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17 10 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your question is an oxymoron in my logic. Pulling meat was invented as a way to use the tough and otherwise less used/desirable parts of animals. This is why you cook them beyond done. To break down the connective tissue that otherwise makes the cut tougher thereby less desirable.

In the end, from where I sit, beef taste like beef so if I were going to pull beef to make sammiches I would choose the cheapest cut I could find. If I were to cook a sirloin or prime rib then I would cook to desired taste and take it off the grill. They are tender without cooking past done.

That has always been my logic but I appear to be wrong???
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Buckeye Bob
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17 10 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

But he's not making "pulled" beef, he's making "pit" beef. Different thing.
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kurtsara
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17 10 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Soapm wrote:
Your question is an oxymoron in my logic. Pulling meat was invented as a way to use the tough and otherwise less used/desirable parts of animals. This is why you cook them beyond done. To break down the connective tissue that otherwise makes the cut tougher thereby less desirable.

In the end, from where I sit, beef taste like beef so if I were going to pull beef to make sammiches I would choose the cheapest cut I could find. If I were to cook a sirloin or prime rib then I would cook to desired taste and take it off the grill. They are tender without cooking past done.

That has always been my logic but I appear to be wrong???


didn't the original poster want to make pit beef, don't you slice that?

so you would use a leaner cut
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Huey
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17 10 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lump wrote:
Huey.
Thank you !!!!!!!


Huey wrote:
Top round is traditional, but since it's expensive, I've been known to use bottom round. With bottom round, you just have to watch for veins of tough meat/gristle in the roast.


Don't forget the tiger sauce (half mayo/half horsey works for me).

One other thing: Pit beef is grilled, traditionally, not smoked. I like to use direct heat on each side of the roast until a crust forms, then switch to indirect heat until the temp hits about 145.

Rest, slice thin, serve with onions and the sauce on a Kaiser roll.


My pleasure, Lump. I was born in Baltimore, and it's considered Baltimore's contribution to the BBQ world, even though it isn't slow cooked.


You might want to pull the meat at 135-140, as it will likely coast up a bit. I find the bottom round needs to be cooked a bit more than top round. I would pull the top round at 135 for sure.

Sorry if I'm too late on that. I find medium just cuts a bit better, but I neglected to account for the coast in my last post to you.


Last edited by Huey on Sun Oct 17 10 9:03 am; edited 1 time in total
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Soapm
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17 10 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kurtsara wrote:
Soapm wrote:
Your question is an oxymoron in my logic. Pulling meat was invented as a way to use the tough and otherwise less used/desirable parts of animals. This is why you cook them beyond done. To break down the connective tissue that otherwise makes the cut tougher thereby less desirable.

In the end, from where I sit, beef taste like beef so if I were going to pull beef to make sammiches I would choose the cheapest cut I could find. If I were to cook a sirloin or prime rib then I would cook to desired taste and take it off the grill. They are tender without cooking past done.

That has always been my logic but I appear to be wrong???


didn't the original poster want to make pit beef, don't you slice that?

so you would use a leaner cut


Oh, I guess I thought he was pulling it.
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Huey
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17 10 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been inspired. I have a good part of a bottom round we got at Costco, quartered and frozen. It's now defrosting.


I love to use Kirkland (Costco brand) steak seasoning. (I think it may be made by McCormick's actually). Failing that, Montreal steak seasoning is great for a nice crust. A little olive oil slather and generous seasoning. The crust gets nice and dark, and when sliceddASC dsdxc waferfd thin, it's....arrrrgh.


Sorry. Drool made the keys slippery there.
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Lump
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18 10 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PIT MAN PIT !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
this is why the moronic logic is not working , no pulling here!!!!!

Soapm wrote:
Your question is an oxymoron in my logic. Pulling meat was invented as a way to use the tough and otherwise less used/desirable parts of animals. This is why you cook them beyond done. To break down the connective tissue that otherwise makes the cut tougher thereby less desirable.

In the end, from where I sit, beef taste like beef so if I were going to pull beef to make sammiches I would choose the cheapest cut I could find. If I were to cook a sirloin or prime rib then I would cook to desired taste and take it off the grill. They are tender without cooking past done.

That has always been my logic but I appear to be wrong???

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Soapm
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18 10 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lump wrote:
PIT MAN PIT !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
this is why the moronic logic is not working , no pulling here!!!!!

Soapm wrote:
Your question is an oxymoron in my logic. Pulling meat was invented as a way to use the tough and otherwise less used/desirable parts of animals. This is why you cook them beyond done. To break down the connective tissue that otherwise makes the cut tougher thereby less desirable.

In the end, from where I sit, beef taste like beef so if I were going to pull beef to make sammiches I would choose the cheapest cut I could find. If I were to cook a sirloin or prime rib then I would cook to desired taste and take it off the grill. They are tender without cooking past done.

That has always been my logic but I appear to be wrong???


He could just slice it very thin and pile it high on a bun... Smile
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whitey
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18 10 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



Thats pit beef....





At least that what I think it is..
French Dips,Yum....
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Lump
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18 10 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whitey,
what model Berkel is it and how do you like it !!!!!

Bill

whitey wrote:


Thats pit beef....





At least that what I think it is..
French Dips,Yum....

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whitey
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18 10 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I will have to look..Dont know off hand..Jane bought a new 1 for the Raunt and retired it to the house.
Its a commercial unit and its real nice..Adjustable and super easy to clean.
And its nice for slicing meat real thin like My Canadian bacon and Sirloin roast for french dips.
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Marky C
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18 10 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I second the bottom round. I like to cook it to very rare with a nice crust on the outside. Slice thin, dunk in au jus. Sliced thin, it will finish cooking in the hot au jus. Add some horseradish and swiss, yumm.
I have cooked many on a drum smoker at 325 to 350. Good luck.
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Soapm
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19 10 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How d you guys make the au jus?
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Huey
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19 10 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't, actually. If I did, I would likely put a foil tray under the roast during the indirect cooking portion, then keep it under the roast during the rest portion. I would add a bit of water (a cup or so) and perhaps some beef bouillon, reduced until the desired consistency was hit.


Just a thought.

I let the meat rest above its juice, but I will put the meat back in the juice after slicing.
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