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Texman
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Joined: 19 Oct 2005
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Location: Del Rio, TX

PostPosted: Oct 19 2005    Post subject: Research question Reply with quote

We are seeking experienced knowledgeable input for the below:

Assuming a non-pumped, non-injected product (no water added).

For commercial resale volumes, such as a restaurant, food show vendor, wherein sales income is based on cooked meat weight, not green weight (condiments, nor plate meals are not factored, only shrink loss is sought).

Using traditional smokers, or direct heat (over the coals) what would be the shrink cooking loss (percentage) from purchase weight of the below?

Pork Spareribs (meaty)
Bone-in CC pork chops (1 ¼” thick)
T-bone steak (1 ¼” thick)
Beef Brisket, with 1/8” fat trim
Chicken leg qtrs.
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BBQMAN
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Joined: 13 Jun 2005
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Location: Florida

PostPosted: Nov 01 2005    Post subject: Reply with quote

For my business, these types of meats are sold by the portion (you choose the weight) not by finished weight. As an example, a slab of St.Louis style ribs at an average cost of $7-$8 sells for $18-$20 in my area.

Depending on the cut of steak, a steak dinner is priced by the plate, not by the pound. You will need to determine profit margin.

Pulled pork, you can expect to have about a 40%-50% loss due to shrinkage and bones, which is different than the other meats. The average price here is $10.00 a pound, so I sell a 5oz. pork sandwhich for $5.00 at the market.

Hope this helps!?
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Texman
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Joined: 19 Oct 2005
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Location: Del Rio, TX

PostPosted: Nov 02 2005    Post subject: Reply with quote

BBQMAN wrote:
For my business, these types of meats are sold by the portion (you choose the weight) not by finished weight. As an example, a slab of St.Louis style ribs at an average cost of $7-$8 sells for $18-$20 in my area.

Depending on the cut of steak, a steak dinner is priced by the plate, not by the pound. You will need to determine profit margin.

Pulled pork, you can expect to have about a 40%-50% loss due to shrinkage and bones, which is different than the other meats. The average price here is $10.00 a pound, so I sell a 5oz. pork sandwhich for $5.00 at the market.

Hope this helps!?


Neat site BBQMan!

We also do catering (started 6 months ago, in Texas), where prices are based on the plate, with condiments....lot more profit in catering.

To get exposure (since we are new) we started going to food shows/fairs/festivals, which has generated additional catering business. We didn’t start going to these events until we did some research and actually making tours. We found most people like finger foods, so we opted for pork spare ribs, wherein we lay the freshly cooked ribs in front of them, let them choose how many they want, cut 'em off, weight 'em, wrap 'em in butcher paper, let 'em grab paper towels and go eat.

Our sales success has been great – we’ve sold out every time at $8.50 per pound. First outing 150#, with 26% shrink, second outing 300# first day and 200# second day, with a 51% shrink (apparently made error in wrapping cooked ribs in foil, which added more shrink), third outing 220# with 34% shrink.

So the shrink is important to us since it adds to the cost of business, or less sales income.

With the limited information above, and since you are in FL, us-uns in TX, what would you sell at food shows/fairs/festivals to get exposure for your catering business?
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Alien BBQ
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PostPosted: Nov 02 2005    Post subject: Reply with quote

I saw this in the Philippines (P.I.) and you might consider it here. In the P.I. everything is sold on a stick, if you took a bamboo skewer and poked it thru thick sliced brisket, you could sell it by the slice. Also very popular on Cuban street corners is the same thing done with pork. And finally, add a little vinaigrette, some cheese, lettuce, and wrap in a tortilla shell and you got a Greek gyro.
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BBQMAN
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Location: Florida

PostPosted: Nov 02 2005    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Texman, we have been working hard at it since 2001. I quit the"day job" about two years ago after getting a similar start as you are!

To answer your question, I would sell what you specialize in. Ribs, Pulled Pork, and Brisket in Texas (and here!) probably go real well. I would reccomend that you sell the ribs by the rib(s), not by the pound. For instance we sell by the whole slab of St.Loius (I assume that is what you refer to as a "meaty" rib) style ribs, or two big ribs with grilled flatbread w/garlic and herbed olive oil for $5.00. If the ribs are small, I give em three. Our chopped pork is a favorite, but I only bring just so much of it so people will buy/try our ribs too! Then they almost always come back and take some home for dinner or football! I always tell my take home rib customers to NOT microwave the meat. Warm up in the oven or grill only. I gave the instructions to a gal that covers the local scene with a little newspaper. The next week, she told me her ribs were tough, then told me she microwaved them! Rolling Eyes Alien has a good idea with the meat on a stick. For people that want just a taste (or on a budget), it may go over well at festivals.

Good luck with your business. Sounds like you are well on your way! Very Happy
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DawgPhan
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Joined: 12 May 2005
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PostPosted: Nov 02 2005    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alien BBQ wrote:
I saw this in the Philippines (P.I.) and you might consider it here. In the P.I. everything is sold on a stick, if you took a bamboo skewer and poked it thru thick sliced brisket, you could sell it by the slice. Also very popular on Cuban street corners is the same thing done with pork. And finally, add a little vinaigrette, some cheese, lettuce, and wrap in a tortilla shell and you got a Greek gyro.



nothing about that says greek to me. maybe if you added feta, a pita, and a yogurt sauce, then you might have something greek...
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BBQMAN
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PostPosted: Nov 04 2005    Post subject: Reply with quote

And there you go again, Dawgfan! Laughing Anything constructive to add to Texmans original question? Rolling Eyes
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DawgPhan
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PostPosted: Nov 04 2005    Post subject: Reply with quote

BBQMAN wrote:
And there you go again, Dawgfan! Laughing Anything constructive to add to Texmans original question? Rolling Eyes


Rolling Eyes
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Texman
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PostPosted: Nov 04 2005    Post subject: Reply with quote

BBQMAN wrote:
Thanks Texman, we have been working hard at it since 2001. I quit the"day job" about two years ago after getting a similar start as you are!

To answer your question, I would sell what you specialize in. Ribs, Pulled Pork, and Brisket in Texas (and here!) probably go real well. I would reccomend that you sell the ribs by the rib(s), not by the pound. For instance we sell by the whole slab of St.Loius (I assume that is what you refer to as a "meaty" rib) style ribs, or two big ribs with grilled flatbread w/garlic and herbed olive oil for $5.00. If the ribs are small, I give em three. Our chopped pork is a favorite, but I only bring just so much of it so people will buy/try our ribs too! Then they almost always come back and take some home for dinner or football! I always tell my take home rib customers to NOT microwave the meat. Warm up in the oven or grill only. I gave the instructions to a gal that covers the local scene with a little newspaper. The next week, she told me her ribs were tough, then told me she microwaved them! Rolling Eyes Alien has a good idea with the meat on a stick. For people that want just a taste (or on a budget), it may go over well at festivals.

Good luck with your business. Sounds like you are well on your way! Very Happy


We use pork Sparerib, which includes the breastbone (sternum) and cartilage versus a St. Louis Style rib, which has all of this trimmed off.

Our SPR cost is $1.39 per pound (4.5 lb. avg) versus SLRibs cost $2.30 per pound (3.5 lb avg), both come with 11 ribs. We haven’t had a need, nor request for back ribs yet, besides they are too expensive.

Our spareribs will run in length from 3” to 9”, which considering this we could not figure out how to sell ‘em on a per rib basis, thus the reason we sell by the pound, but we have to endure the shrink problem. We would be happy with a 20% shrink, but have to figure out the errors first.

The fairs have been an enlightening experience, even though we have only been to three. At first people are kind of gun shy, but the aroma draws ‘em to us. At the three different set ups we gave samples, then they would buy one or two ribs, walk off tell someone and then they would come back, buy a half rack, and then later a couple of racks to take home. Toooo funny, and fun.

We understand your $5.00 for two big ribs, with garlic bread, and we understand your rack price, but if you were only selling the ribs (SLRibs), per rib, what would you price ‘em at? We ask ‘cause we’re trying to figure out how to generate more income and keep people happy at the same time.

Due to your experience in catering, you know that it is an easy figure layout and guarantee, but these fairs are where we need to be to help build the catering business and appreciate your input.
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BBQMAN
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Joined: 13 Jun 2005
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Location: Florida

PostPosted: Nov 04 2005    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good morning Texman! I have helped a number of others that are interested in expanding thier buisneses' Please send me a PM with a phone number and a good time to call. I have been very busy, but will be happy to take some time out to chat with you! Very Happy

Best Regards,
Mike
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