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Brewed Awakening Beef Brisket

 
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ROMattox95



Joined: 15 Dec 2010
Posts: 6
Location: Fulton, MS

PostPosted: Fri Mar 18 11 10:28 am    Post subject: Brewed Awakening Beef Brisket Reply with quote

Marinade:
5 cups warm water
5 cups brewed coffee
1 whole brisket (approx 15 lbs.)
4 Tbs Worcestershire Sauce
4 Tbs Season with Reason

Rub:
cup brown sugar
cup freshly ground coffee
1 Tbs freshly ground black pepper
6 Tbs Season with Reason

Directions
For the marinade: In a large bowl, add the water, coffee Worcestershire Sauce and Season with Reason and stir. Add the brisket. If the liquid does not cover all of the meat, flip the brisket halfway through the marinating time. Use injector to inject the marinade into the brisket. Refrigerate for 8 hours or overnight.

For the Rub: In a small bowl, mix together the brown sugar, ground coffee, Season with Reason, and black pepper.

Remove the roast from the refrigerator and discard the marinating liquid. Pat the brisket dry with a paper towel. Using your hands, coat the brisket on all sides with the rub, gently massaging it into the flesh.

Place on smoker (fat side up) and smoke with hickory chips or a combination of hickory and or apple chips. For a little twist, use fresh brewed coffee in the water pan. Smoke for 8-10 hours or until desired temperature is reached. (Medium = 160 degrees, Well Done = 170 degrees)

If your not sure what Season with Reason is, check my website.
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Last edited by ROMattox95 on Sat Mar 19 11 1:15 pm; edited 1 time in total
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SmokinOkie
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Joined: 16 Aug 2005
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 18 11 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a question.

WHY brine beef? I've done a lot of testing on beef and it just never really did anything for me and those who ate it.

What do you like about brining beef?
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Jarhead
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Joined: 11 Oct 2009
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Location: Marionville, Home of the White Squirrels, Missouri

PostPosted: Fri Mar 18 11 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I will stick with my Jaccard, Big Ron's In The House, wrap, overnight in the cooler and smoke.
No brining beef for me. What a waste.
However, I occasionally brine SPAM Laughing Rolling Eyes
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ROMattox95



Joined: 15 Dec 2010
Posts: 6
Location: Fulton, MS

PostPosted: Sat Mar 19 11 2:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why brine beef? Well, I really like the flavor that the coffee brine adds to the beef. It's not over powering, just gives it a little more flavor. And its not a brine in the traditional since. Most brines are heavy in salt. This brine has very little salt. So it might be more accurately called a marinate.

But to each his own. All I can say is don't cut it till you've tried it.
Very Happy
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ROMattox95



Joined: 15 Dec 2010
Posts: 6
Location: Fulton, MS

PostPosted: Sat Mar 19 11 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jarhead and SmokinOkie, after reading your comments, I decided it might be a good idea for me to understand the difference between a brine and a marinade. After researching the topic, the liquid in this recipe is definitely not a brine. So, I edited the recipe to be a little more accurate. Hope you like my revisions.
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SmokinOkie
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 19 11 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wasn't knocking it, just curious why you called it a brine.

For me, a brine is a salt based "soak" and via osmosis will penetrate all the way through if left to soak long enough.

Marinades are acid based and tend to only penetrate the outer 1/2" or less.

If you really like the taste, strain it and inject it to get the flavor deep.

I hope it didn't sound like we were knocking it, just asking for details.

I'm of the "if it works for you" fan club, that's all that counts.
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ROMattox95



Joined: 15 Dec 2010
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Location: Fulton, MS

PostPosted: Sun Mar 20 11 12:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SmokinOke, sorry if I miss read your intentions. I thank you for asking the question. It made me think a little more about how I write recipes.

I took another recipe that sounded good and modified it to make it more like what I wanted. In the original recipe, it was a brine. It had like 4 cups of salt in it. I took the salt completely out because I didn't think it needed the salt. When I re-wrote the recipe, I didn't really think about what the definition of a brine was, so I just used the term just like the original recipe did.

After you questioned it, I looked up the definition. According to the definition I found, a brine should contain at least as much salt as sea water (2.6%). The liquid in this recipe is about 0.3% salt. So it's definitely not a brine. But if your definition of a marinade is that it is acid based, I'm not sure that is the right term either. Any suggestions?

I did another one of these briskets yesterday and I did inject the liquid. Thought my brother-in-law was going to make himself sick eating it last night. Very Happy
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SmokinOkie
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 20 11 8:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ROMattox95 wrote:
But if your definition of a marinade is that it is acid based, I'm not sure that is the right term either. Any suggestions?



Are you asking for a source? That's been the cooking / chef's definition of what a marinade is for years. If I get time I'll go find a reference, but I've seen that same defintion more times than I remember. I just think most people have never heard it defined.

Did a quick lookup on Wikipedia (not always THE source, but it's a start. They don't give a quote to source of why it says "often acidic":

Quote:
Marination is the process of soaking foods in a seasoned, often acidic, liquid before cooking. The origins of the word allude to the use of brine (aqua marina) in the pickling process, which led to the technique of adding flavor by immersion in liquid. The liquid in question, the 'marinade', must be either acidic with ingredients such as vinegar, lemon juice, or wine or enzymatic (made with ingredients such as pineapple or papaya.)[1] Along with these liquids, a marinade often contains oils, herbs, and spices to further flavor the food items.

It is commonly used to flavor foods and to tenderize tougher cuts of meat.[2] The process may last seconds or days. Different marinades are used in different cuisines. For example, in Indian cuisine the marinade is usually prepared with mixture of spices.

In meats, the acid causes the tissue to break down, allowing more moisture to be absorbed and giving a juicier end product.[2] However, too much acid can be detrimental to the end product. A good marinade will have a delicate balance of spices, acids, and oil. It is generally not recommended that raw marinated meats be frozen, as the marinade can break down the surface and make the outer layer turn mushy.[3]

Often confused with marinating, "macerating" is a similar form of food preparation.

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ROMattox95



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Location: Fulton, MS

PostPosted: Mon Mar 21 11 10:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks SmokinOkie. That got me started doing some more research. Although marinade may not be the perfect term, I can't find a better one. Even though the marinade is not acidic, there doesn't seem to be a better term to describe it. I might experiment with some acidic ingredients as see how that effects the recipe.
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chuckwagon



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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23 13 8:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know this an old thread, I was just digging for a way to improve my brisket. I always thought coffee was acidic, at least that's what my doctor says when she tells me not to drink it because I have an ulcer.
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